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Archive for May, 2010

An Android App to Secure Your Communications from Wire-taps

May 26, 2010 Leave a comment

“Forbes is reporting that Moxie Marlinspike and Stuart Anderson’s startup, Whisper Systems, has released a public beta of two Android applications that provide encrypted call and SMS capabilities for your Android phone.

In the wake of recent GSM attacks, it’ll be interesting to see if smartphones end up providing a platform that fundamentally changes the security we can expect from mobile communication.”

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A Seven-Atom Transistor

May 26, 2010 Leave a comment

“University researchers have created a transistor by replacing just seven atoms of silicon with phosphorous.

The seven-atom transistor has very hopeful implications for the future of quantum cryptography, nuclear and weather modeling, and other applications.

‘The significance of this achievement is that we are not just moving atoms around or looking at them through a microscope,’ says Professor Michelle Simmons, a co-author of a paper on the subject that is being published by Nature Nanotechnology.

The paper is entitled ‘Spectroscopy of Few-Electron Single-Crystal Silicon Quantum Dots’.”

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Try Android 2.2 Froyo on Your PC!

May 24, 2010 Leave a comment

Already have a Nexus One? No?

Don’t worry – you can now play around with Android 2.2 Froyo on your computer itself – regardless of it being a Windows, a Linux or a Mac machine.

All you have to do is to download the free Android SDK from here first (according to you OS), and then go through the guide that Gizmodo has posted.

To quote them…

“Any mobile OS with apps has an SDK—a developer kit—which gives devs the tools needed to create and test apps for the platform. And any good SDK comes with an emulator for the OS itself, so devs can test apps without actually installing them on a phone.

Apple’s got one, but it only works on Macs.

Microsoft’s got one, but it only works on PCs.

Google’s Android emulator, on the other hand, works on any platform, and it’s totally free.

Here’s how to load up Android Froyo on your desktop in just a few minutes.”

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A Comedy Of Errors!

May 21, 2010 Leave a comment

By generating an error message, the computer tries to convey that something is wrong.

At least that is what an error message is supposed to do.

But all that will change when you take a look at the following error messages.

Please bear in mind that these are all real error messages.”

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First Self-Replicating Synthetic Life Created

May 21, 2010 Leave a comment

“Man-made DNA has booted up a cell for the first time.

In a feat that is the culmination of two and a half years of tests and adjustments, researchers at the J. Craig Venter Institute inserted artificial genetic material — chemically printed, synthesized and assembled — into cells that were then able to grow naturally.

“We all had a very good feeling that it was going to work this time,” said Venter Institute synthetic biologist Daniel Gibson, co-author of the study published May 20 in Science. “But we were cautiously optimistic because we had so many letdowns following the previous experiments.”

On a Friday in March, scientists inserted over 1 million base pairs of synthetic DNA into Mycoplasma capricolum cells before leaving for the weekend. When they returned on Monday, their cells had bloomed into colonies.”

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Run Froyo on Your iPhone 3G!

May 21, 2010 Leave a comment

You’ll remember David Wang, the coder who has been working on the iPhone 3G Port of Android (iDroid) project.

Well, good news is that the code (ver 0.2) is now ready to be downloaded and installed on your iPhone 3G.

Though it seems that the latest release still has some issues to be ironed out, like power management, performance and sundry bugs, you can still try it out on your iPhone 3G just for the fun of it.

David has posted an installation guide on PC World you just might want to browse through first.

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A Cloud-Based Music Repository Unveiled for Android

May 20, 2010 Leave a comment

“In the race to make music accessible from anywhere, MSpot’s music service has a somewhat novel approach: Don’t sell anything, yet, and don’t sign any major label deals.

Instead, the service allows people to upload their music — be it purchased, ripped or downloaded for free — and access it from any Mac, Windows or Google Android device. MSpot’s model avoids the stumbling blocks of licensing deals which have repeatedly delayed the release of a U.S. version of Spotify — a paid, streaming music service that’s immensely popular in Europe.

MSpot is currently in private beta mode, but users can request invites on the company’s website to try the web and/or Android version.

The way it works is simple: Rather than trying to recognize the music files on your computer and replicate it in the cloud, which would likely invite licensing issues with the labels, MSpot literally uploads your music collection from iTunes, Windows Media Player, and/or any folders you specify — maintaining any ratings and metadata you may have set up in iTunes by scanning its XML database. The upload process takes at least several hours depending on processing power and connection speed, but once it’s there, you’re good to go.”

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