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Are The Antibiotics Killing Your Good Bacteria Permanently?

“It’s an accepted concept by now that taking antibiotics in order to quell an infection disrupts the personal microbiome, the population of microorganisms that we all carry around in our guts, and which vastly outnumbers the cells that make up our bodies.

That recognition supports our understanding of Clostridium difficile disease — killing the beneficial bacteria allows C. diff room to surge and produce an overload of toxins — as well as the intense interest in establishing a research program that could demonstrate experimentally whether the vast industry producing probiotic products is doing what it purports to do.

But implicit in that concept is the expectation that, after a while — after a course of antibiotics ends — the gut flora repopulate and their natural balance returns.

What if that expectation were wrong?

In a provocative editorial published this week in Nature, Martin Blaser of New York University’s Langone Medical Center argues that antibiotics’ impact on gut bacteria is permanent — and so serious in its long-term consequences that medicine should consider whether to restrict antibiotic prescribing to pregnant women and young children.

Early evidence from my lab and others hints that, sometimes, our friendly flora never fully recover. These long-term changes to the beneficial bacteria within people’s bodies may even increase our susceptibility to infections and disease. Overuse of antibiotics could be fuelling the dramatic increase in conditions such as obesity, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, allergies and asthma, which have more than doubled in many populations.”

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  1. September 4, 2011 at 11:13 pm

    An article in The Economist of September 3rd-9th 2011 talks about the experiments performed on rodents and suggests that bacteria dwelling in the gut can affect the brain, and thereby influence an individual’s mood and behavior. The role of probiotics in the diet has been mentioned.
    This idea is not new at all. Homeopaths have been aware of the effect of the bowel flora on the health for almost a hundred years. This was first highlighted by John Paterson in the early 1900s.
    It is heartening to note that what was published by a homeopath in the early 20th century is being confirmed by modern day researchers.
    Your readers may want to read more about this at:
    http://homeopathicure.wordpress.com/2011/09/04/can-bugs-deter…e-our-behavior/

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