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Archive for the ‘Design’ Category

Is Faraday the Future of Bicycles?

October 11, 2011 1 comment

“This ain’t no fixie with a minty fresh paint job, this is the Faraday.

Built for the Oregon Manifest design competition, ideas factory Ideo teamed up with bike builders Rock Lobster Cycles to produce this retro-technotastic electric bike.

Everything futuristic has been hidden inside the frame: those parallel top tubes hold a series of lithium-ion batteries which juice up the front-hub motor — all controlled from the green box tucked beneath the seat cluster.

Those two prongs up front serve as built-in headlights and the base of a modular racking system, letting you swap out various carrying mechanisms like a trunk or child seat with the pop of a bolt.”

The iPhone Always has a 3.5″ Screen. Why?

October 9, 2011 Leave a comment

iPhone 4S
16GB/32GB/
64GB
iPhone 4
16GB/32GB
iPhone 3GS
16GB/32GB
iPhone 3G
8GB/16GB
iPhone
4GB/8GB
Screen Size** 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5
Resolution 960×480 960×480 480×320 480×320 480×320

 

Have you ever wondered why during the evolution of iPhones, right from the first model to the recently announced 5th generation iPhone 4S, the screen has retained the same dimension?

Although many of the contemporary phones sport a much larger screen of more than 4″, why has Apple stuck to the 3.5″ screen for iPhone?

Dustin Curtis has probably found the answer – simple human ergonomics:

Touching the upper right corner of the screen on the Galaxy S II using one hand, with its 4.27-inch screen, while you’re walking down the street looking at Google Maps, is extremely difficult and frustrating.

I pulled out my iPhone 4 to do a quick test, and it turns out that when you hold the iPhone in your left hand and articulate your thumb, you can reach almost exactly to the other side of the screen.

This means it’s easy to touch any area of the screen while holding the phone in one hand, with your thumb. It is almost impossible to do this on the Galaxy S II.

 

Desert Living Tackled With California Roll House

October 7, 2011 Leave a comment

“At times, the simplest form with least manipulation from its original form can offer visual amenities and adapted solution to the context.

California Roll prefabricated house takes this methodology to create its morphological adaptation to its environemt : desert.

Homogeneous exterior material which provides high grade of energy efficiency and reflects heat from the sun covers the entire surface except for glass panels which is electronically controlled to change its transparency.

Modularization of every structure members and finish materials are maximized to provide mobilty with rapid assembly and disassembly on site.

To sustain its challenging structural stand, carbon fibre truss frame under neath the exterior material holds the entire architecture.

Hydraulic powered automatic doors and security system is used for main entrance door which allows less spaces to operate the door mechanism.

California Roll house features these latest technologies applied to architecture which breaks the boundary of product or vehicle design and architectural design which brings more mobility to living spaces.”

Mutewatch Mutely Shakes Your Wrist For Reminders

October 2, 2011 1 comment

“No, the picture above isn’t some modernized Power Ranger’s wrist communicator.

This is the Mutewatch, and we’ve been intrigued since we first laid eyes on it over a year ago.

At a glance, it looks akin to a rubber fashion bracelet, which could make its $260 price tag a shocker. But with the right touch or flick it reveals itself to be much more.

The Stockholm-based start-up behind it, dubbed Mutewatch AB, envisions the device serving as “time management tool” for setting quick wrist-felt vibrating reminders during the course of the day. Think Growl, but on your wrist.

The wristwatch lacks a dial and crystal, and instead has an angled, touch-sensitive section for a face with hidden LEDs, an ambient light sensor, a motion sensor and a vibrating motor for alarms.”

SeaTwirl Uses The Ocean As Roller Bearing To Produce Energy

September 30, 2011 Leave a comment

“Swedish eco-designers, Ehrnberg Solutions AB, have just completed their most successful prototype of the floating SeaTwirl vertical wind turbine.

The device captures and harvests offshore wind, without having to convert the energy as it is being stored. SeaTwirl is the first of its kind with only two moving parts, and it uses only sea water as a roller bearing, omitting the need for a gearbox or transmission.

SeaTwirl is already being praised as one of the most simple and cost effective wind turbines ever made. Its vertical blades spin, absorbing energy from the wind and storing it throughout a water filled torus.

The torus also holds the turbine above sea level and assists in the spinning even when winds have died down. Meanwhile, a tiny generator at the bottom of the turbine then converts the energy to electricity.”

The Polymorphic Bench is Almost Alive!

September 30, 2011 Leave a comment

Keeping the current trend of designing “kinetic” furniture (that morph into different shapes according to the motions and contours of its users) alive, here is another one which is almost similar in functionality but completely different in construction to the “Cay Sofa” reported a fortnight ago.

“Polymorphic is a kinetic installation utilizing an innovative design and engineering solution inspired by the simple kinetic action of a see-saw and the reverberating motion of a Slinky.

The design is comprised of a double-sided bench which transforms through a series of 119 unique and interconnected sections into a chaise lounge and finally an interactive balance board.

These sections are connected via an inventive pivot and bolt system which allows the vertical movement of one section to be picked up by others down the line.

Together, this motion allows the installation to transform from a series of leveled sections into an undulating form activated through interaction with its occupants.

While the overall form of the bench is realized as a continuous landscape, each seating condition was designed according to existing ergonomic profiles in order to maximize comfort and functionality.”

Drinking Fountain Gently Serves You Water

September 27, 2011 Leave a comment

“Poietic Studio’s latest project, the Tropism Well, is a drinking fountain with a difference. As you approach it, it gently bows down to pour water into your glass…

Richard Harvey and Keivor Stainer formed Poietic a few months ago and the Tropism Well is their second project. Apparently making use of the “natural laws of physics to function”, say the designers, “once it has seen you, the gently bowing motion is created simply by moving water up and down the stem.””