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Performance of iPhone 4S is Comparable to iPad

October 11, 2011 Leave a comment

“Apple’s ability to control the entire information chain, down to the point of limiting leaks, appears to be gradually slipping as it grows as a company.

Case in point are the numerous hardware and performance leaks surrounding the newly launched iPhone 4S. Little did we know that several weeks ago we were staring at photos of the 4S’ PCB, and more recently we’ve seen the first performance results from Apple’s first A5 based smartphone thanks to a few eager users around the web.

We’ve compiled these results here from various sources (all linked below) and compared them to our existing database of tests.”

CyanogenMod 7.1 Releases. 24 Phones Added. Includes Xperia.

October 11, 2011 Leave a comment

“All it took was a little love from Sony Ericsson and now CyanogenMod’s latest official release includes support for a happy cohort of 2011 Xperias as well as the X8.

The same goes for Samsung, which doled out a free GSII and some employment and now finds that the Galaxy smartphones are on version 7.1’s list too.

Wondering if your particular Droid, Optimus or Incredible can run the cyan shade of Gingerbread and its attendant perks?”

These are the phones that have been added to the list that can now run CM 7.1:

  • HTC Desire S
  • HTC Incredible S
  • HTC Incredible 2
  • LG Optimus 2X and T-Mobile G2x
  • Motorola Backflip (Motus)
  • Motorola Cliq / Cliq XT
  • Motorola Defy
  • Motorola Droid 2
  • Motorola Droid X
  • Samsung Captivate
  • Samsung Fascinate
  • Samsung Mesmerize
  • Samsung Showcase
  • Samsung Vibrant
  • Samsung Galaxy S
  • Samsung Galaxy S2 (multiple carriers)
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia X8
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Mini
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Mini Pro
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Neo
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Play
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Ray
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc
  • ZTE V9

 

Turn Your iPhone Camera Into a Microscope for $30

October 11, 2011 2 comments

“UC-Davis researchers developed a lens that’ll turn your iPhone or any camera-enabled smartphone into a 350X microscope.

The mod is a simple 1-mm ball lens mounted in rubber that’s taped to your phone’s camera. It costs about $30.

Besides its obvious uses in the classroom and research field, this basic lens could be a useful tool for doctors in impoverished areas.

It’s resolution of 1.5 microns is sensitive enough that doctors can use it to view red blood cells and diagnose blood diseases like iron deficiency sickle-cell anemia.”

A Video Introduction of Siri on iPhone 4S

October 9, 2011 Leave a comment

 

The iPhone Always has a 3.5″ Screen. Why?

October 9, 2011 Leave a comment

iPhone 4S
16GB/32GB/
64GB
iPhone 4
16GB/32GB
iPhone 3GS
16GB/32GB
iPhone 3G
8GB/16GB
iPhone
4GB/8GB
Screen Size** 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5
Resolution 960×480 960×480 480×320 480×320 480×320

 

Have you ever wondered why during the evolution of iPhones, right from the first model to the recently announced 5th generation iPhone 4S, the screen has retained the same dimension?

Although many of the contemporary phones sport a much larger screen of more than 4″, why has Apple stuck to the 3.5″ screen for iPhone?

Dustin Curtis has probably found the answer – simple human ergonomics:

Touching the upper right corner of the screen on the Galaxy S II using one hand, with its 4.27-inch screen, while you’re walking down the street looking at Google Maps, is extremely difficult and frustrating.

I pulled out my iPhone 4 to do a quick test, and it turns out that when you hold the iPhone in your left hand and articulate your thumb, you can reach almost exactly to the other side of the screen.

This means it’s easy to touch any area of the screen while holding the phone in one hand, with your thumb. It is almost impossible to do this on the Galaxy S II.

 

All You Need To Know About The iPhone 4S and iOS 5 Announced Today

October 4, 2011 Leave a comment

Now Phones Can Analyze Your Bad Breath, Hunger Level and Body Fat

October 4, 2011 Leave a comment

“It’s been a busy year for NTT DoCoMo’s research and development division, with the company presenting a goldmine of future accessories at its CEATEC booth.

We’re not seeing anything terribly exciting in the smartphone department, beyond a wider adoption of Android, but from the battery with a 10-minute charge time that we saw yesterday to the bad breath, hunger, body fat and food analyzers that you’ll find below, there are certainly quite a few gadgets worth checking out.

We’re bundling a few of them here, so jump past the break for our hands-ons with three different health accessories (including a bad breath analyzer!) and a clever food analyzing app.”

A Cellphone That Can Fully Charge in 10 Minutes?

October 3, 2011 Leave a comment

“NTT Docomo, one of Japan’s largest carriers, has developed a prototype battery that’s capable of achieving a complete charge in just ten minutes.

NTT reps weren’t willing to get into much detail about the new technology, which currently employs an external lithium-ion battery sleeve and is only designed to support NEC’s super-slim Medias Android (Japan only) smartphone.

They did let us take a look at the battery sleeve’s AC adapter, which supports output of up to 6.0 amps, but otherwise appeared to be fairly generic.

A pair of amp meters compared the power draw of a standard battery with that of the ultra high speed charger, which pulled 0.55 amps and 5.86 amps, respectively — at least according to the demo equipment on hand at NTT’s CEATEC booth.

The model we saw definitely looked very much like an early prototype at this point, and the carrier didn’t seem to have any idea of when it may begin to be implemented in handsets and other devices, only committing to a release “as soon as possible”.”

Massive Security Vulnerability Found In HTC Android Devices

October 2, 2011 1 comment

“In recent updates to some of its devices, HTC introduces a suite of logging tools that collected information. Lots of information. LOTS. Whatever the reason was, whether for better understanding problems on users’ devices, easier remote analysis, corporate evilness – it doesn’t matter. If you, as a company, plant these information collectors on a device, you better be DAMN sure the information they collect is secured and only available to privileged services or the user, after opting in.

That is not the case. What Trevor found is only the tip of the iceberg – we are all still digging deeper – but currently any app on affected devices that requests a single android.permission.INTERNET (which is normal for any app that connects to the web or shows ads) can get its hands on:

  • the list of user accounts, including email addresses and sync status for each
  • last known network and GPS locations and a limited previous history of locations
  • phone numbers from the phone log
  • SMS data, including phone numbers and encoded text (not sure yet if it’s possible to decode it, but very likely)
  • system logs (both kernel/dmesg and app/logcat), which includes everything your running apps do and is likely to include email addresses, phone numbers, and other private info

Normally, applications get access to only what is allowed by the permissions they request, so when you install a simple, innocent-looking new game from the Market that only asks for the INTERNET permission (to submit scores online, for example), you don’t expect it to read your phone log or list of emails.

But that’s not all. After looking at the huge amount of data (the log file was 3.5MB on my EVO 3D) that is vulnerable to apps exploiting this vulnerability all day, I found the following is also exposed (granted, some of which may be already available to any app via the Android APIs):

  • active notifications in the notification bar, including notification text
  • build number, bootloader version, radio version, kernel version
  • network info, including IP addresses
  • full memory info
  • CPU info
  • file system info and free space on each partition
  • running processes
  • current snapshot/stacktrace of not only every running process but every running thread
  • list of installed apps, including permissions used, user ids, versions, and more
  • system properties/variables
  • currently active broadcast listeners and history of past broadcasts received
  • currently active content providers
  • battery info and status, including charging/wake lock history
  • and more

Let me put it another way. By using only the INTERNET permission, any app can also gain at least the following:

ACCESS_COARSE_LOCATION Allows an application to access coarse (e.g., Cell-ID, WiFi) location
ACCESS_FINE_LOCATION Allows an application to access fine (e.g., GPS) location
ACCESS_LOCATION_EXTRA_COMMANDS Allows an application to access extra location provider commands
ACCESS_WIFI_STATE Allows applications to access information about Wi-Fi networks
BATTERY_STATS Allows an application to collect battery statistics
DUMP Allows an application to retrieve state dump information from system services.
GET_ACCOUNTS Allows access to the list of accounts in the Accounts Service
GET_PACKAGE_SIZE Allows an application to find out the space used by any package.
GET_TASKS Allows an application to get information about the currently or recently running tasks: a thumbnail representation of the tasks, what activities are running in it, etc.
READ_LOGS Allows an application to read the low-level system log files.
READ_SYNC_SETTINGS Allows applications to read the sync settings
READ_SYNC_STATS Allows applications to read the sync stats

 

 

Update (4th Oct 2011): HTC Confirms Flaw, Promises Patch

 

Nokia Developing Linux Based “Meltemi” OS for Low-End Phones

October 1, 2011 1 comment

“Nokia Corp., having abandoned its ambition to develop a high-end operating system, is shifting its programming efforts toward creating software for its low-end phones, according to people familiar with the matter.

The project is a Linux-based operating system code-named Meltemi, the Greek word for dry summer winds that blow across the Aegean Sea from the north. It is being led by Mary McDowell, the handset maker’s executive vice president in charge of mobile phones, these people say.

A spokesman for Nokia, Doug Dawson, declined to comment on the Finland-based company’s future products or technologies.

Nokia’s attempt to build its own software is another sign that the value in the technology industry is shifting from hardware to software. In the past year, Google Inc.’s Android software has dominated the midrange smartphone market while Apple Inc.’s iPhone, which runs Apple’s iOS software, has captured the high end.

Analysts say mobile-handset makers that have their own software, such as Apple, have big advantages. They can better define their products against rivals and aren’t dependent on other companies for growth.”