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CyanogenMod 7.1 Releases. 24 Phones Added. Includes Xperia.

October 11, 2011 Leave a comment

“All it took was a little love from Sony Ericsson and now CyanogenMod’s latest official release includes support for a happy cohort of 2011 Xperias as well as the X8.

The same goes for Samsung, which doled out a free GSII and some employment and now finds that the Galaxy smartphones are on version 7.1’s list too.

Wondering if your particular Droid, Optimus or Incredible can run the cyan shade of Gingerbread and its attendant perks?”

These are the phones that have been added to the list that can now run CM 7.1:

  • HTC Desire S
  • HTC Incredible S
  • HTC Incredible 2
  • LG Optimus 2X and T-Mobile G2x
  • Motorola Backflip (Motus)
  • Motorola Cliq / Cliq XT
  • Motorola Defy
  • Motorola Droid 2
  • Motorola Droid X
  • Samsung Captivate
  • Samsung Fascinate
  • Samsung Mesmerize
  • Samsung Showcase
  • Samsung Vibrant
  • Samsung Galaxy S
  • Samsung Galaxy S2 (multiple carriers)
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia X8
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Mini
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Mini Pro
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Neo
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Play
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Ray
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc
  • ZTE V9

 

Google Releases Dart

October 11, 2011 Leave a comment

“Google has released an early version of Dart, a new programming language designed to take some of the pain out of developing applications for the Web. But while it’s an evolutionary improvement on JavaScript, Dart faces a hard uphill battle for acceptance.

Dart is an object-oriented, structured programming language designed to ease some of the problems that developers run into writing large Web-based applications. It has a structure that will be familiar to most developers who have worked with JavaScript.

But Dart is more easily organized into smaller methods and objects than in scripting languages, so as to avoid monstrous monolithic blocks of code that are difficult to maintain. It’s also designed to be more self-documenting (in the tradition of Python).

On Google’s Chromium and Code blogs, Google Dart team software engineer Lars Bak wrote,“Generally, the contracts with other parts of an application are conveyed in comments rather than in the language structure itself. As a result, it’s difficult for someone other than the author to read and maintain a particular piece of code.””

Braille App Makes Tablets Accessible to Blind Persons

October 11, 2011 Leave a comment

“The Braille system has allowed blind people to read the written word since 1825. Unfortunately, Braille doesn’t translate well to the glossy smooth surfaces of modern touch screen tablets and phones. A new app thinks it can change that…

The new app was created by NMSU undergraduate Adam Duran, Stanford Assistant Professor Adrian Lew, and Stanford Doctoral candidate Sohan Dharmaraja as part of the Army High-Performance Computing Research Center’s (AHPCRC) annual two-month summer immersion course. It allows the blind to use tablets via the Braille eight-button keyboard but with an important twist.

Instead of requiring the user to find virtual buttons on a glass surface (how frickin’ impossible is that?), the individual keys orient themselves to the correct finger whenever the user touches the screen. “They’re customizable,” Dharmaraja said in a press release. “They can accommodate users whose fingers are small or large, those who type with fingers close together or far apart, even to allow a user to type on a tablet hanging around the neck with hands opposed as if playing a clarinet.””

A Video Introduction of Siri on iPhone 4S

October 9, 2011 Leave a comment

 

Chrome Can Now Control Another Desktop Remotely With New Extension

October 9, 2011 Leave a comment

The Chrome remote desktop extension lets a person remotely control another computer over the network, in this case using Chrome on a Mac to control a Windows machine also running Chrome. (Credit: Google)

“Months of work on “chromoting” have reached fruition with Google’s release on Friday of a new Chrome extension to let a person on one computer remotely control another across the network.

The Chrome Remote Desktop beta version, which arrived Friday, is a browser-based equivalent of remote desktop software for conventional operating systems.

Such software is handy for IT administrators managing employees’ machines, people taking care of their relatives’ computers, or individuals getting access to their own machines from afar.”

Oracle has Ambitious Plans for Client-Side Java with JavaFX 2.0

October 9, 2011 Leave a comment

“Java has long been a hit with enterprise developers, with Java EE powering the back ends of enterprise applications in data centers around the world, while Java application servers and servlet containers enable countless Web applications.

For client-side development, however, Java hasn’t fared nearly as well…

So it’s been tempting to assume that Oracle, with its strong enterprise focus, would ignore the client in favor of data center technologies such as Java EE.

This week, we learned that’s not the case. In fact, the real news from this year’s JavaOne conference in San Francisco may not be Oracle’s plans for Java 8 and 9, but the revelation that Oracle is gearing up for a new, sustained push behind Java for the desktop, the Web, and mobile devices. If it can succeed in its ambitious plans, the age of client-side Java could be just beginning.”

Ancient Greek City being “Raised” from the Bottom of Aegean Sea

October 8, 2011 Leave a comment

“A submerged ancient Greek city, from the heroic era portrayed in Homer’s Iliad, is being ‘raised’ from the bottom of the Aegean.

Using cutting edge underwater survey equipment and site reconstruction software, archaeologists and computer scientists have joined forces to map and digitally recreate a Bronze Age port which was swallowed by the waves up to 3000 years ago.

It’s the first time that a submerged city has ever been fully mapped in photo-realistic 3D.

The entire city – covering 20 acres – has been surveyed in ultra-high definition, with error margins of less than three centimetres.

The survey – carried out by an archaeological team from the University of Nottingham – is the subject of a special BBC Two documentary, tomorrow Sunday evening.”